We Were Here (and She’s Still Here)

Zuni Mountains, the historical logging railroad route.

Impossible to drive it without imagining the hills as they were: clearcut, scalped naked. The subsequently-eroded red Abó dirt has young trees on it now, but here and there you can spot a patriarch the loggers missed or spared. Human presence of that era is all over: rusty cans, purple glass, busted cheap commercial china. A rusted shovel. Disintegrating ponderosa trunks, felled and abandoned, scattered like pick-up-sticks.

We climbed a red hill of Abó sandstone. En route, found a pair of (modern) safety goggles, an unopened can of Mexican beer, and a mother nighthawk so intent on distracting us from her nest that she rolled around with her feet in the air.

Starry

A spring in a big rincón, westward-facing. Water, with help from prevailing winds, had carved out an arching cave in the sandstone perhaps 30 feet high. Its ceiling was dotted with grapefruit-size nests of cliff swallows. The birds flew over us, alarmed and crying.

On the arch is a Navajo “star ceiling,” probably Cassiopeia. Look for the stars, red ochre Xes. Then look more closely: there are faint, perhaps earlier black stars as well.

 

Until You Know

Scores of stone circles. I’ve written about them before. Too small to be hogan or tipi rings, wrong shape/size/place to be hunting blinds. (Though we did come upon a blind that overlooked a draw: U-shaped, right for one man to lie on his belly.)

The circles are very old. No idea what they can be if not for so-called “vision quests,” in the nature of “go out there and fast until you know your true name.” Who can tell? There was not one that didn’t have a view of Cabezón, the Ladrones, or the Sandias. All those peaks are sacred.

Shirtsleeve warm, and a restless, intermittent wind.

 

 

Still at the Ready

We walked across the scanty dump of a sheepherder’s camp: rusty tin cans,  bits of glass, a watering trough tinkered out of something like an old water heater.  The herder had brought his family, for in the scatter was a plastic Indian from a “cowboys and Indians” set.  Quick research says the first plastic soldiers were made in 1938, but I could find no info on a Western set to which this guy might belong.

Here he lies in a handsome concretion to show him off. The sun has eaten him and given him a cracked patina, but you can still tell he is getting an arrow from his quiver.

There’s a Word for It

The Syncline was wet, sanded smooth with surface wash, all the rocks bright.

Everywhere there were little tinajas, rain pools, like eyes looking upward. A plunge pool guarded by a Cooper’s hawk and a tiny, lively frog. The sunny vanilla scent of many ponderosas.

There’s a Zuni word, ołdi, for the smell of the desert right after rain.

sync-tinaja

sync-expanse

Toadally

It’s a race to the finish. In the last warm little sun-pools of the monsoon rains, toad tadpoles are growing legs as fast as they can. Ravens and garter snakes have gobbled most of them, but a few laggard babies are still working on pedestrianism.

The cold is coming. The tiny survivors need to tuck up somewhere against the frosts.

Toes & Toads

 

boots-sync-toestadpoles

 

boots-sync-toestoad

Concretions

Concretions form in a slurry of mud or sand, when a bit of organic material starts a chemical reaction that alters the minerals in the surrounding slush. Most often it forms a sphere, but sometimes all kinds of weird shapes.
Eventually the reaction stops and the slurry hardens into stone. Aeons later, when the stone is exposed, the concretions—usually harder than the surrounding rock—weather out.
As in the top photo, if you break the concretion open you may see traces of the original reaction. Pretty!
Boots Cuba bflyconcr
Boots SnLuis marbles
Boots SnLuis wheel
Boots SnLuis planets

Being Here

Placitas. From the high trail, the Sunday church bell’s ringing fills the valley below.

A scream: two hawks and a raven, harrying all over the sky. The hawk’s keening cry falls like its falling body, streamlined stone.

A slight rockfall in a narrow canyon.

A coyote turd with three dozen apricot pits.

Boots

Boots Cebolla green sprout

Malpaís and Mockingbirds

Malpaís.  The McCartys flow rivals anything in Hawaii. Underfoot the clink and chink, the almost metallic scraping ring of scoria where flat sheets of it have popped off the still-hot surface.

Black, black. Splits and fissures with grasses, mountain mahogany, and a few cacti clinging to their walls. As we scrambled west—wearing leather-palmed gloves, too aware of our bare legs—we climbed a pressure ridge in the lava, a standing black crest so steep we clambered up it on all fours . In its glassy crevices claret cup cacti  were just beginning to bloom, the most beautiful red I’ve ever seen.

May is mockingbird month, when they return from their winter grounds. We listened to their changing carols all day.

Boots

Boots Malpais copy

Betsy James On Writing, World-making, and Walking on Stone